Project Description

Golden Stimulator

Pattern Description:

The Golden Stimulator is a more specific color variation of the standard Stimulator as tied by Randall Kaufmann. This variation matches the smaller golden stone adults so common to the Front Range. This fly incorporates a variety of tying tricks, from the tail spreading egg sack to the Uni-Floss abdomen and is both a great attractor and imitator. I like to fish this fly through broken riffles and pocket water or along the bank from a boat. It has a wide, fish-attracting profile and really pulls fish up. Do not limit this fly to the springtime Golden Stone hatch periods only. While it certainly works then it also pulls fish throughout the summer months.

Materials Needed:

Hook: TMC 2312 #6-14
Thread: Fire Orange 70 Denier
Egg Sack: Tying Thread
Tail: Natural Cow Elk Hair
Rib: Fine Copper Wire
Abdomen: Uni-Stretch Floss, Pumpkin
Body Hackle: Brown Rooster Neck
Wing: Natural Cow Elk Body
Front Hackle: Grizzly Neck Hackle
Thorax: Peacock Herl

Step 1

Attach tying thread and wrap back to the bend. Build a small ball (oval) at the bend of the hook. This ball should line up between the point on the barb and the point on the hook and will imitate the egg sack of the natural. Yes, I know, the natural’s egg sack is dark but the bright color on this fly just adds a little highlight.

Step 2

Cut, clean and stack a small clump of elk hair. Measure the elk hair so it is equal in length to the gap of the hook.

Step 3

Tie the elk hair tail down in front of the egg sack with several tight turns of thread. Build a band of thread at the base of the tail to secure the hair, forcing the thread wraps back against the egg sack and thus flaring the hair at the bend.

Step 4

Spiral the thread forward over the butt ends of the hair to the sixty percent point on the hook and build another short band of thread there. This step forms a buoyant elk hair underbody and builds needed bulk on the shank.

Step 5

Clip the butt ends of the elk hair off flush.

Step 6

Tie in an eight-inch length of copper wire at the front edge of the body and wrap the thread back over it to the base of the tail.

Step 7

Thread the Uni-Stretch Floss through a bobbin with a non-flared tip. Leave a short tag end of floss hanging out the end of the bobbin. With the tying thread at the front of the elk hair underbody, place the Uni-Floss bobbin tube against the near side of the hook and make a single turn of thread around the hook and the bobbin tube. Thats right, you just tied the bobbin tube to the hook shank.

Step 8

Here comes the cool part: Pull down on the tying thread and pull back on the floss bobbin so the thread jumps off the end of the floss bobbin and captures the floss. This method eliminates handling the floss with your fingers, assures you always have enough floss to get the job done and eliminates waste. Neat trick, eh?

Step 9

Wrap the tying thread back to the base of the tail over the floss. Return the tying thread to the front of the elk hair underbody.

Step 10

Wrap the floss over the underbody forming a very smooth, slightly tapered overbody. Depending on the size of the fly, you may need to make two or more layers of floss. The floss will twist as you wrap it so be sure to counter-spin the bobbin occasionally to eliminate the twist and assure that the floss lies flat on the hook. Tie off the floss with the tying thread at the front of the underbody and clip the excess.

Step 11

Build a short thread base on the shank at the front edge of the body. Select (fibers equal to one and a half hook gaps) and prepare a brown rooster neck feather by stripping its base of fibers for a length of about three eye lengths. Tie the hackle feather in by its butt end at the front edge of the body with the inside of the feather facing toward the body. This will assure that the fibers tilt toward the bend of the hook when it is wrapped in the next step.

Step 12

Grasp the tip of the hackle feather in your hackle pliers and begin palmering (wrapping in spiral turns) the feather back toward the bend of the hook.

Step 13

Make six to eight evenly spaced turns of hackle. Once at the base of the tail, hold the feather tip above the hook and make a single turn over the hackle tip with the wire you tied in earlier.

Step 14

Spiral the wire forward through the hackle taking care not to bind down any of the fibers.

Step 15

Tie the wire off with the thread at the front edge of the body and break off the excess. Snap the left over tip of the hackle feather toward the front of the hook to break it off as well.

Step 16

Cut, clean and stack a large clump of elk hair. Measure the hair so the tips extend to the base of the tail.

Step 17

Tie this clump of hair in at the front edge of the body with a narrow band of thread. Try to compress the hairs as much as possible with this initial band.

Step 18

Work the thread forward in small incremental turns through the butt ends of the wing as if you were trying to spin the hair. This maneuver will bind down each hair individually and create less bulk as well as a taper when we trim it in the next step.

Step 19

Draw the butt ends of the hair above the hook in your fingertips and clip them (the hairs, not your fingers) as close as possible. You may need to go back and trim any stray or long hairs with a second pass.

Step 20

Be particularly careful to clear out any hairs around the eye of the hook.

Step 21

Build a smooth, tapered thread base over the remaining butt ends of the wing.

Step 22

Prepare and tie in a grizzly hackle feather by its butt end at the base of the wing. Again, be sure that the inside of the feather is facing the shank.

Step 23

Select about six or eight nice peacock herls and trim the tips square. Tie these in at the rear edge of the index point (one eye length behind the hook eye) and wrap the thread back over them to the base of the wing. Return the thread to the index point. (You may want to add a thin layer of Zap-A-Gap to the thread base before wrapping the peacock to increase durability).

Step 24

Wrap the herls forward to the index point forming a bushy thorax. Tie off the remaining herl and clip. Build a smooth thread base at the index point in preparation for tying off the hackle in the next step.

Step 25

Palmer the grizzly feather forward through the peacock thorax with five or six evenly spaced turns. Pull the tip of the feather straight up and tie it off with the thread.

Step 26

Clip the excess hackle tip. Build a smooth thread head and whip finish.