Rusty Spinner

2020-04-30T23:02:32-06:00

Rusty Spinner Pattern Description: This pattern is a variation on the standard rusty spinner that has a good bit of added floatation and visibility. The addition of the palmered thorax hackle makes the fly much more visible and helps keep it afloat. I have used this pattern everywhere from the Henry’s Fork to the Frying

Goddard Caddis

2020-04-28T09:38:14-06:00

Goddard Caddis Pattern Description: The Goddard Caddis is one of my favorite old-timey flies and a great adult caddis imitation. The hair body keeps the fly afloat much longer than other more conventional patterns. I remember tying this fly when I was a kid and vividly recall the trials and tribulations associated with spinning deer

Bloom Caddis

2020-04-17T09:01:46-06:00

Bloom Caddis Pattern Description: This unconventional little parachute caddis pattern comes from the vise of Dave Bloom of Montana’s Missouri River. Dave is an awesome tyer and his patterns are in huge demand for the techy fish of the Big Mo. This is a cool pattern to tie and fish, its hi viz para post

Mugly Caddis

2020-04-14T09:26:31-06:00

Mugly Caddis Pattern Description: The Mugly Caddis is a pattern I developed after my first evening on the Henry's Fork. I had fished to sporadically rising fish all evening with little success. Meanwhile, another angler, slightly downstream seemed to be hooked up every time I looked his way. I cornered him near dark and with

Comparadun

2020-02-15T17:37:00-07:00

Comparadun Pattern Description: The Comparadun pattern has been one of my go-to patterns for a long time. This fly is the ultimate in simplicity and lends itself well to a variety of mayfly species. You can simply change the colors of the materials to match everything from Pale Morning Duns to Baetis to Green Drakes,

Royal Wulff

2020-02-05T06:55:11-07:00

Royal Wulff Pattern Description: The Royal Wulff has become the standard attractor dry in the years since its inception by the legendary Lee Wulff. Hair wings and tail, a multi-colored body, and a heavily hackled collar make this a buoyant, highly visible fast-water fly. I have no idea what makes this fly so attractive to

Humpy

2019-01-27T12:21:09-07:00

Humpy Pattern Description: The Humpy is my all time favorite attractor pattern and happens to be one of the first "real" flies I ever learned to tie. Its elk hair body and wings and heavy hackle make it an excellent floater and highly visible to boot. My favorite colors are yellow, chartreuse and tan, but

Parachute Adams

2019-01-27T10:20:32-07:00

Parachute Adams Pattern Description: The Parachute Adams is without a doubt, one of today's most popular patterns. The high visibility wing coupled with the lower floating parachute hackle team up to provide a solid fish-catching silhouette with angler appeal. The PA can imitate any type of mayfly, even though it is too dark for some

Elk Hair Caddis

2018-06-05T18:15:24-06:00

Elk Hair Caddis Pattern Description: The Elk Hair Caddis brings us into the world of dry flies. Dries are more proportion dependent than nymphs as the proportions affect the way the fly sits on the water. The body taper and diameter, the hackle size and density and the length and density of the wing are

X Caddis

2018-06-05T18:18:53-06:00

X Caddis Pattern Description: The X-Caddis comes from Yellowstone fishing guru Craig Matthews. Craig is the guy who brought us the Sparkle Dun and a host of other effective patterns, trademarked by their simplicity. The X-Caddis is no exception, and can be whipped out by the dozens! I like the X-Caddis in smaller sizes, from